Melt-in-your-mouth Japanese Rolled Chashu for Ramen - Instant Pot Pressure Cooker | My Station

Melt-in-your-mouth Japanese Rolled Chashu for Ramen - Instant Pot Pressure Cooker

294K Views
5K Likes
How to make Japanese Chashu in a pressure cooker (recipe):
http://bit.ly/rolledchashu
**IMPORTANT NOTE: USE NON-STICK PAN FOR SEARING! DO NOT use Instant Pot for searing even though I mentioned in the video. I received feedback from a viewer (THANKS to Melissa) that the skin would stick to the IP.

Watch the rest of ramen series here:
- Ramen egg: https://youtu.be/xL8R0uchKN0
- Shoyu ramen: https://youtu.be/tCBUV7Ub3pQ
- Miso ramen: https://youtu.be/xeUEPR6EzxY

----- (affiliate links below) -----
Instant Pot electric pressure cooker that I used: http://amzn.to/2yAt5YT
Japanese hot pot skimmer that I used: http://amzn.to/2ii1NUi

Ingredients:
500 g pork belly, skin on
1/2 cup soy sauce
4 slices ginger
1 cup water
1/2 cup cooking sake (http://amzn.to/2zU6w56)
4 garlic, crushed
1 leek
1/2 cup mirin (http://amzn.to/2izrDQM)

Chashu is a critical topping for many types of ramen and is often times the hardest thing to get right. When it’s done well, the sweet savory skin will melt in your mouth, adding a punch of flavor to the noodles. The fat will give the broth even more richness and the succulent meat will fall apart with the slightest bite. The chashu will accent and enhance a good bowl of ramen and make it great.

Andy and I like to visit some great ramen shops whenever we travel to other cities to taste different kinds of ramen. Traditional ramen shops often top their ramen with 2-3 pieces of chashu. Unlike Chinese chashu or “char siu” (barbecued pork), the Japanese chashu uses pork belly that is rolled into a long cylinder and slow cooked in a pork/chicken broth, then transferred to a soy-based broth that consists of soy sauce, sake, and mirin and cooked for hours, as you can see the pictures below. If you want to make the chashu like this, you have to ask your butcher for a special cut. But I was able to just buy the pre-cut ones (much smaller) from the Asian grocery stores and make it at home.